10.25.2009

SUNDAY, October 25
Sylvia Bursztyn (calendar puzzle)

Theme: "Done With Addition" — Theme answers are familiar phrases with the word OVER added to them somewhere to create new wacky phrases clued ?-style.

[Note: This is the puzzle that appears in the Sunday L.A. Times newspaper. If you don't get the paper, you can find the puzzle here. Scroll down to see the write-up of today's syndicated puzzle.]


Theme answers:
  • 25A: Cost of hens, coops, etc.? (EGG OVERHEAD).
  • 42A: Follow up on inventing the wheel? (DISCOVER BRAKES).
  • 85A: Embellished reporting? (GILDED COVERAGE).
  • 104A: Pitch a president? (HEAVE HOOVER).
  • 16D: Sport played among jetsam? (OVERBOARD GAME).
  • 24D: The morning after? (HANGOVER TIME).
  • 48D: Hyde's cowboy counterpart? (DROVER JEKYLL).
  • 51D: Scraps in Dr. Frankenstein's lab? (LEFTOVER BRAIN).
Everything Else — 1A: Temporary tender (SCRIP); 6A: Dell output (PCS); 9A: Cop's collar (PERP); 13A: Indian appetizer (SAMOSA); 19A: "Ain't --- Shame" (THAT A); 20A: Syllable before disant (SOI); 21A: Purim's month (ADAR); 22A: Go places (TRAVEL); 23A: Beyond beautiful (RAVISHING); 27A: Whitney Houston's label (ARISTA); 28A: Asian appetizer (SATAY); 30A: Vena --- (CAVA); 31A: Hwy. (RTE); 32A: Vietnam's --- Dinh Diem (NGO); 33A: Namibian's neighbor (ANGOLAN); 35A: Pueblo people (ZUNIS); 36A: Stein or Stiller (BEN); 37A: Crème-crème filler (DE LA); 39A: Jewish folklore figure (GOLEM); 40A: Blender button (PUREE); 41A: Dix or Knox (FORT); 45A: World-weary (BLASÉ); 46A: PBS program (POV); 47A: Bent a bit (STOOPED); 48A: Costly (DEAR); 49A: Bonnie Bramlett's bandmate (DELANEY); 53A: Parrot lions (ROAR); 54A: Lobster's little look-alike (CRAWDAD); 57A: "A Star Is Born" song (EVERGREEN); 60A: Carson's sidekick (MCMAHON); 62A: Boxer's "Back off!" ("GRR!"); 63A: "A jest" per John Gay (LIFE); 64A: Grimm works (TALES); 66A: Comic Smirnoff (YAKOV); 67A: Whitish (PALE); 68A: Body image of a sort, for short (TAT); 69A: Track break (PIT STOP); 71A: Sing in court (NAME NAMES); 73A: False appellations (ANONYMS); 75A: Sluggish (SLOW); 77A: Method (PROCESS); 78A: Ignominious (VILE); 79A: Like Snow White (FAIREST); 82A: Henson or Morrison (JIM); 83A: Dunne with five Oscar nominations (IRENE); 89A: Used to be (WERE); 90A: Heraldry's red (GULES); 91A: Like Nike (GREEK); 92A: Da ---, Vietnam (NANG); 94A: Mass garb (ALB); 95A: Igloos, essentially (DOMES); 96A: Annie Oakley, for one (DEADEYE); 98A: Doo-wop syllable (SHA); 99A: Knight's title (SIR); 100A: Gyrene's org. (USMC); 101A: Italian scooter (VESPA); 102A: Alpacas' kin (LLAMAS); 107A: Graceless (INELEGANT); 109A: Ply the sky (AVIATE); 110A: Languish (PINE); 111A: Sgt., e.g. (NCO); 112A: Pancho's TV pal (CISCO); 113A: James of "Desperate Housewives" (DENTON); 114A: Big jerk (YANK); 115A: Xer opener (GEN); 116A: Keepsake (TOKEN); 1D: Hair piece (STRAND); 2D: Used plastic (CHARGED); 3D: Cappelletti cousin (RAVIOLI); 4D: "--- the East, and Juliet ..." (IT IS); 5D: Carbo-loader's course (PASTA); 6D: It comes after chi (PSI); 7D: Instrument panels (CONSOLES); 8D: CHP traffic caution (SIGALERT); 9D: Song of tribute (PAEAN); 10D: On tenterhooks (EDGY); 11D: Car-wash cloth (RAG); 12D: Obtained (PROCURED); 13D: Wonder of music (STEVIE); 14D: What Polonius hid behind (ARRAS); 15D: --- -jongg (MAH); 17D: Ushers (SEATERS); 18D: Like firm fettuccine (AL DENTE); 26D: Directional devices (VANES); 29D: Jeffrey of "Arrested Development" (TAMBOR); 34D: Sacto VIP (GOV); 35D: Violinist Pinchas (ZUKERMAN); 38D: "An heir and ---" (A SPARE); 40D: Vatican rule (PAPACY); 41D: Recall cause (FLAW); 43D: DC group (CONG.); 44D: Word with elbow or engine (ROOM); 45D: Word with coffee or jelly (BEAN); 49D: American competitor (DELTA); 50D: Naive, backward and French? (EVIAN); 52D: "The Tower" poet (YEATS); 54D: Munch (CHOMP); 55D: Van Gogh locale (ARLES); 56D: Shift or sheath (DRESS); 58D: Raised lines? (ELS); 59D: Business figure (NET SALES); 61D: Rap sheet letters (AKA); 65D: Cone and cube (SOLIDS); 67D: Arcade classic (PACMAN); 69D: War correspondent Ernie (PYLE); 70D: Tiny hole (PORE); 72D: Jacques' black (NOIR); 74D: Start time for Judy, Violet and Doralee (NINE); 76D: Pieces of pie (WEDGES); 79D: Office keeper (FILE COPY); 80D: CSI collectible (SCRAPING); 81D: Performance en pointe (TOE DANCE); 83D: "They tricked me!" ("I WAS HAD!"); 84D: Spell (RELIEVE); 85D: Marx brother born Milton (GUMMO); 86D: "Rubber Ball" singer Bobby (VEE); 87D: Doughboy's gear (GAS MASK); 88D: Intensify (ENHANCE); 90D: Genesis land (GOSHEN); 93D: Alphonse's friend (GASTON); 95D: Because of (DUE TO); 96D: Jacobi or Jeter (DEREK); 97D: Vote in (ELECT); 101D: Hardy's Diggory (VENN); 103D: Exchange fee (AGIO); 105D: Cabernet container (VAT); 106D: Through (VIA); 108D: Eternity (EON).

10 comments:

Djinn said...

Thanks for the post, PG. I needed it today to fix a glitch at 68A and 49D. I had used CAT (scan) for "body image of a sort " which gave me Delco as the American competitor and sadly spelt out "ononyms" for "anonyms" forcing me to Google it.

Since I'm already familiar with Onan and onomastics fascinate me, I got excited thinking that I was about to learn a brand new word, but no soap. Google lists no such word. Adding to my confusion, names were elsewhere featured on this grid--Names names and soi-disant along with a ton of proper nouns.

After giving the cross too much thought, I couldn't imagine the answer TAT and had to read it here. Of course, TAT (tattoo) is better than CAT anyway.

Onanism may not lead to blindness, but I am learning to recognize my own blind spot as a CW Cub Solver. I often needlessly complicate problems. Son of Judah! Let me trust myself more and simplify, simplify simplify.

It's a wonderful resource that you offer us here. I'm especially grateful to get the LAT Sunday answers without a week-long waiting period. Thanks, again.

Djinn said...

Thanks for the post, PG. I needed it today to fix a glitch at 68A and 49D. I had used CAT (scan) for "body image of a sort " which gave me Delco as the American competitor and sadly spelt out "ononyms" for "anonyms" forcing me to Google it.

Since I'm already familiar with Onan and onomastics fascinate me, I got excited thinking that I was about to learn a brand new word, but no soap. Google lists no such word. Adding to my confusion, names were elsewhere featured on this grid--Names names and soi-disant along with a ton of proper nouns.

After giving the cross too much thought, I couldn't imagine the answer TAT and had to read it here. Of course, TAT (tattoo) is better than CAT anyway.

Onanism may not lead to blindness, but I am learning to recognize my own blind spot as a CW Cub Solver. I often needlessly complicate problems. Son of Judah! Let me trust myself more and simplify, simplify simplify.

It's a wonderful resource that you offer us here. I'm especially grateful to get the LAT Sunday answers without a week-long waiting period. Thanks, again.

October 25, 2009 12:41 PM

JIMMIE said...

I am also grateful that you do this blog, PG, and please keep it up.

I found this one harder, what with ARRAS, GULES,and the proper names, NGO, DENTON, ARISTA, YAKOV, but it was fun. I actually pulled my copy of Hamlet to find out what Polonius hid behind in act III.

Djinn may have pulled something else?

JN said...

I did an unusual amount of googling to complete the puzzle. Even with that, I got stuck on 68A and 49D. Thanks for the clarification. It makes more sense than delco and cat.

I still don't understand 20A soidistant. I couldn't find a definition for that. Help would be appreciated.

JIMMIE said...

Unabridged Webster defines soidisant as self-styled, self-named, so-called, from the French.

mac said...

Nice Liz Bursztyn puzzle, almost always like her work.
Who doesn't love samosas and satay, and craw daddies!
Thought the Heave Hoover was a little disrespectful;-).
Go YANKS!!!

Djinn said...

@Jimmie: Sorry to be a jerk and post myself twice. I really ought to pay attention to the business at hand.

@mac: Go YANKS! indeed

Anonymous said...

Absolutely the most difficult puzzle I have ever attempted - gave up after seven hours and two days. I have no computer so my grandson is sending this. I gues word knowledge doesn't count in puzzles anymore. Just another thing that's been taken away from seniors, I guess.

carc90405 said...

I love Liz's puzzles and this one is no exception. I wonder if she chooses the Theme Title however. This one "Done With Addition" is rather bland and no real clue to the wacky phrases. Might have used "......And Again And Again And......."[=....plus over,plus over,plus over....." or "When The Fat Lady Sings...Eight Times" [= OVER used 8 times]

Tuttle said...

Toe dance?

TOE DANCE!?

And let's talk about the definitive filmography of Gummo Marx...